Writing a Deductive Sermon Outline

Writing a deductive sermon outline is made easier if you understand the structure of a deductive sermon outline.


How to Write a Deductive Sermon Outline

A deductive sermon outline begins with the main preaching point followed by the sub-points and incidental points.

For example, if you were to preach Romans 1:1-7, then you would need to find the main preaching point.

The main preaching point of Romans 1:1-7 could be: Sharing Christ With Great Enthusiasm.

Once you have the main preaching point, you will need to develop to develop the sub-points.

Your sub-points could be: we need to have the right heart (1:1), we need to have the right goal (1:2-4), and we need to have the righ challenge (1:5-7).

Your deductive sermon outline is starting to take shape.

There are three ways for sharing Christ with great enthusiasm. They are...

  • We need to have the right heart (1:1)
  • We need to have the right goal (1:2-4)
  • We need to have the right challenge (1:5-7)

Notice the sub-points expand and explain the main preaching point of the sermon.

For more information on writing a sermon outline, click on How To Write A Sermon or Writing A Sermon Outline.

Once you have your main preaching point and sub-points, you will need to expand and explain your sub-points.

Your deductive sermon outline may look like this...

There are three ways for sharing Christ with great enthusiasm. They are...

  1. We need to have the right heart (1:1) Three examples:

    1. Paul knew he belonged to Christ (1:1a)
    2. Paul knew he was sent by Christ (1:1b)
    3. Paul knew he was set apart to preach the gospel (1:1c)

  2. We need to have the right goal (1:2-4) Two goals:

    1. Paul's goal was to make Christ known (1:2-4)
    2. Paul's goal was to make Christ known through the preaching of the gospel (1:3-4)

  3. We need to have the right challenge (1:5-7) The challenges:

    1. For Paul, the challenge was to bring people to faith (1:5)
    2. For us, the challenge is the same (1:6-7)

Now that you have your deductive sermon outline, you will need to write an introduction, write content to your deductive sermon outline, and write a conclusion.

Writing an Introduction To Your Deductive Sermon Outline

Usually, you write the introduction after you have constructed your deductive sermon outline.

An introduction introduces the main preaching point of your sermon.

If you use the deductive sermon outline above, then your introduction would introduce the main preaching point - Sharing Christ With Great Enthusiasm.

You may use an illustration or story to highlight the importance of sharing Christ with others.

To see how this is done, click on Writing Content To A Sermon Introduction.

Writing Content To The Body of Your Deductive Sermon Outline

Writing a sermon requires you to put sermon content to your sermon outline. If you use the sermon outline above, you will need to put sermon content to each sub-point and incidental point.

To see how this is done, click on Writing Content To A Sermon Outline.

Writing The Conclusion to Your Deductive Sermon Outline

The conclusion of your sermon MUST sum up the main preaching point of the sermon and bring the sermon to a close with a challenge. A Challenge that will encourage your people to take action.

To see how this is done, click on Writing Content To A Sermon Conclusion.

Writing a deductive sermon outline was written by the webmaster of www.more-free-online-sermons.com and www.online-sermon-for-busy-pastors.com.





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