Writing a Sermon

Writing a sermon is not an easy task. Writing a sermon requires an understanding of the structure of a sermon.


How to Write a Sermon

Writing a sermon involves understanding the structure of a sermon.

First, a sermon has three parts - an introduction, the body and a conclusion.

Second, the body of the sermon is the main preaching part of the sermon.

The body of your sermon should expand and explain the main preaching point of your sermon - this is your sermon outline.

Writing a sermon requires writing a sermon outline.

A sermon outline is your road map for writing a sermon. It disciplines you to stick to the main preaching point of your sermon."

Structure your sermon well and your people will be able to follow you in your preaching.

Introduction To Sermon

Usually, you write the introduction after you have constructed a sermon outline.

An introduction introduces the main preaching point of your sermon.

If you use the sermon outline below, then your introduction would introduce the topic - the Bible speaks to us.

You may use an illustration or story to highlight the fact that the Bible speak to us.

To see how this is done, click on Writing Content To A Sermon Introduction.

There are three areas in which the Bible speaks when we read Romans 5:12-14.

  1. The Bible speaks in the area of sin (5:12) Two questions:

    1. Where does sin come from? (5:12a)
    2. Why do I sin? (5:12d)

  2. The Bible speaks in the area of death (5:12-14a) Three statements:

    1. Death comes through sin (5:12b)
    2. Death comes to all men (5:12c)
    3. Death reigns from Adam to Moses and beyond (5:13-14a)

  3. The Bible speaks in the area of life (5:14b) Two facts:

    1. Adam brought death (5:12)
    2. Jesus brings life (5:14b)

The Body of the Sermon

Writing a sermon requires you to put sermon content to your sermon outline. If you use the sermon outline above, you will need to put sermon content to each sub-point and incidental point.

To see how this is done, click on Writing Content To A Sermon Outline.

The Conclusion

The conclusion of your sermon MUST sum up the main preaching point of the sermon and bring the sermon to a close with a challenge. A Challenge that will encourage your people to take action.

To see how this is done, click on Writing Content To A Sermon Conclusion.

I often equate a sermon with flying. Everytime you fly in an airplane, you experience the take-off, the flight and the landing. A memorable flight involves all three going well.

A dynamic sermon will have a powerful take-off (introduction), an interesting flight (body) and a memorable landing (conclusion).

Do all three well and you will write and preach powerful sermons.

Writing a sermon was written by the webmaster of www.more-free-online-sermons.com and www.online-sermon-for-busy-pastors.com Copyright 2009.





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